9N85 Brown Tweed, Closure Size

9N85 Brown Tweed, Closure Size

9N85 Brown Tweed, Closure Size

1S79 New Used, Standard Size

1S79 New Used, Standard Size

1S79 New Used, Standard Size

1S39 Oxford, Standard Size

1S39 Oxford, Standard Size

1S39 Oxford, Standard Size

9S60 Standford, Closure Size

9S60 Standford, Closure Size

9S60 Standford, Closure Size

9N82 Soulard Tudor, Closure Size

9N82 Soulard Tudor, Closure Size

9N82 Soulard Tudor, Closure Size

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Caring For Brick

Caring for BrickWhile one of the main advantages of brick is its low maintenance cost, there are some things you should know to keep your investment looking its best.

  • Before cleaning brick, test it for absorption by thoroughly wetting a section with clean water. Use a garden hose if possible. If the brick becomes darker all at once, clean only a small area at a time, otherwise you can clean up to 100 square feet at a time. In warm weather, it's also a good idea to clean in smaller sections.
  • Always saturate brick with clear water before applying cleaning agents and rinse thoroughly after cleaning.
  • Use wooden, plastic or rubber buckets, wooden scrapers and stiff fiber brushes to clean brick.
  • In most cases, stains can be removed by scrubbing with a stiff brush dipped in a strong solution of household detergent and warm water.
  • To remove smoke stains, make a smooth, stiff paste of trichlorethylene (a refined solvent) or any dry-cleaning solvent, and purified, powdered talc. Apply this paste to the stain with a trowel and scrape off when dry. Repeat until the stain has disappeared and then wash the area thoroughly with clear water.
  • Fresh paint stains can be removed with a commercial paint remover or a solution of two pounds trisodium phosphate, available at paint and hardware stores, to one gallon of water. Apply the mixture to the stain and allow to dry. Remove with a wooden scraper and wire brush. Rinse with water. For older paint stains, you may need to use steel wool or a steel brush. Be sure to protect unstained areas from any chemicals you use.
  • Oil stains can be removed with a paste made of one pound of trisodium phosphate and one gallon of water. Add a small amount of powdered chalk to thicken the paste. Spread about 1/2" of paste over the stain and let it dry. Remove dried paste with a wooden scraper and wash the surface with clear water.
  • Plants and vines growing over brick walls hold moisture and can cause mortar cracking and brick discoloration. To remove them, use a reputable weed killer, following the instructions on the package. Be sure to protect any areas not bothered by growth.

This article excerpt was reprinted from an article on brick information on the Redland Brick web site.